Tuesday, April 22, 2014

52 Week Challenge #12 Claus Oscar "C.O." Carlson




Claus Oscar Carlson
(Klas Oskar Carlsson--Swedish spelling)


a.k.a.
C.O. Carlson
or
Oscar Carlson

Claus Oscar Carlson was my
Great Grandfather, my
Mother's Father's Father.

He was most often called Oscar or C.O.

Claus Oscar Carlson was born in Oja, Flen,
Sodermanland, Sweden.  He was born on the 
24th of March in 1869.
Oscar's parents were Karl Erik Eriksson
and
Johanna Augusta Andersdotter.
Oscar was one of 10 children, Karl Johan "Charlie", Elin Augusta,
Erik Gustaf "Gust", Klas Oskar "Oscar", Anders Axel "Axel", 
August Conrad, Vilhelm Tonnes, Anna Maria, Erika Johanna
and Olivia Viktoria.

The family is pictured below:
Oscar is the young man on the far right.
The photo was taken circa 1880 in Sweden.


As children most of, or all of, the children of the family played
a musical instrument and/or sang.  I can imagine that
it was a lively and joyful household

I wish that I knew more about Oscar and his sibling's growing up years.

I have been able to find birth and death records, written in the
original Swedish! I am still looking for
the marriage record for Oscar and Anna. 

Circa 1892, Oscar married Anna Christian Carlsson.
Two months to the day before Oscar and Anna's first child was
born, (June 30, 1893) Oscar left Vadsbro, Sodermanland and on
July 4, 1893 he boarded a ship in Gothenburg that was
bound for America.

Oscar went to Chicago, Illinois, where a couple of his siblings had
already immigrated to.  Oscar found work, a place to live and made ready
to receive his little family.
Within what seemed like 2 long years, Oscar's wife Anna, and their 
sweet little daughter Ellen Maria Olivia Carlson joined him
in Chicago.

Within approximately a 10 year period, 8 of the Carlson siblings
had immigrated to America, most living in the Chicago area.  Two 
siblings stayed in Sweden, Tonnes and Conrad.

A photo of the "American" Carlson siblings:
In the back row, from the left: Gust, Axel, Elin and Oscar.


 In the front row, from the left: Charlie (he was not able to be there for the photo, so the photographer inserted his image to complete the group), Erika, Anna and Olivia.

The family was close-knit and gathered frequently, entertaining one another with music, songs and 
plays!

In this photo below, Oscar is the gentleman in the back row with the violin.


I had mentioned how the Carlson family were all musically inclined . . . .
When my Great Grandfather Oscar Carlson immigrated to
America, he paid his way on the ship by playing his violin for
the entertainment of the passengers.


Oscar was a Foreman in Construction in the Chicago area.  
One time my Grandfather (Evar, the elder son of Oscar and Anna's)
told of being allowed to "go to work" with his Father.
Oscar was working on a roof not too far from
their home.  He had Evar climb up the ladder first and asked for a
hammer . . . . . . Well, Grandpa Evar handed his Father the 
hammer, but let go before Oscar had an opportunity to get a hold
on the hammer, and the hammer promptly fell on Oscar's head!  
Grandpa Evar was sent on home, and he 
said that was the last time that he was invited to 
"go to work" with his Father!

The Oscar Carlson Family.
Oscar and Anna seated in front.
Back, left to right:
Herbert, Ellen, Evar and Florence.

Oscar and Anna had at least 9 children,
only 4 of whom, lived to adulthood.
When Oscar was just over 50 years old, he changed careers.
He, Anna and their sons Evar and Herbert, moved from Chicago to
Amber, Michigan, where their eldest daughter had just been widowed.
Oscar took over the farming of his daughter
Ellen and her late husband's farmland.
It was on this farm that both Oscar and Anna
lived out their days, lovingly cared for by their children. 
Oscar died of Acute Myocardial Failure on the 
8th of April in 1953.
He was laid to rest in Brookside Cemetery in Scottville, Michigan
beside his wife Anna and surrounded by their children.
C.O. Carlson, circa 1952
Below is the Obituary that ran in the Ludington Daily News, 
April 8, 1953, Page 5, Column 3.





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